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of new york, the city's youngest mayor and the first mayor of color and at the age of 24, just last january, he was sworn in after winning a sweeping a town -- 18 out of 18 districts and winning a four-way mayoral race. before being appointed he was on the city -- the common counsel representing this witty woody's 4th ward. he is a graduate of cornell university where he majored in communications and he was quite active while he was there tutoring underserved students at ithaca and serving as a board member of the racing education attainment challenge organization. immediately to my right is alex morse who is the mayor of holyoke massachusetts. he is also the city's youngest mayor. and he is the second youngest mayor in state history. is that correct? yeah, so he graduated from brown university with a degree in urban studies and during his time at brown he worked as a youth career counselor. he was also on the governors lgbt commission and the main focus of his administration at the moment are early childhood literacy, building an economy focused around art, innovation and technolog
to make the decisions? so i ran for the city council in my junior year when i was 20 years old and i won. four years later i decided that i would like to be the mayor. iran and i won and laboratories of democracy i truly think cities are the frontline frontline of democracy. cities are where ideas get put into action where you can see if they are going to make a difference or not. one of the ideas that i championed it my second year in 2009 back when i was a young man was a smoking ban. banning smoking in public parks outdoors and after playgrounds and dining spaces in the comments which is a buyer -- which is our outdoor pedestrian park. the time it was very radical. the following year mayor bloomberg at the did the same thing in new york city. so he is welcome but that. i sent him a note and i told him any other ideas you want we can talk. you can do these things on a city level because you can reach -- speak to them and not let don't speak over them because you can only keep their attention for this long. who can grab and hold onto their attention what is more he cannot score politica
. we in michigan have to decide in november whether to allow the state to come in to the city and as a public use to take over and print the financial manager were emergency manager for the cities that have financed the distress and take over the local government where they can come in and remove the city officials like the mayor and the city council. i don't think that's the the presidential candidate mitt romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it
buildings and properties in the city which don't pay taxes but use our services and use our roads, put the stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden they have to bear for being the capital city and some times what the state wants to do doesn't necessarily follow the typical ordnances most businesses and residents have to comply with. city ordinances don't necessarily apply to the state so it can be a fraction point but we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far away from the down side that we have to deal with but the biggest challenge is always jobs and that is true of any community. you have seen what we have to offer. it is a vibrant community and there's a lot going on and a brand-new hospital coming online and brand new courthouse that is a $15 million project and the commerce center down the road that is the major construction. we are going to have a big construction project on the interstate that will make traffic move better and commercial development going on in this city and in the census w
, maine. for more information on this and other cities, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> from the 12th annual national book festival in washington, d.c., a discussion about dwight eisenhower with biographer jean edward smith, author of "eisenhower in war and peace," and david eisenhower and julie nixon eisenhower, authors of "going home to glory." it's about 40 minutes. >> we hope you have been enjoying this extraordinary national book festival.nj [applause]vedore >> we have involved more authore than anytime in the 12 yearstor history of this festival. we'rey thankful. your responses make the free public event possible, and one of them is the wells fargo, which has been the sponsor of this particular pavilion, history and biography. in a moment, i introduce to you michael l. golden, wells fargo's regional president for greater washington, d.c., who will introduce our closing authors today. we're privileged to have with him, of course, not only an extraordinary biographer but also the two inheritors of the legacy of the man who is not only led what is often called the greatest generati
this city does to me can stop me now he lifted up his head and waved to his friends. this deal being struck his goal is body shuddered twice and was dead and not yet 14 at the time. those are only three kids that lost their lives that under the age. i mourned for them with their mothers and to the present day. many children in this book battled back courageously against the brunt of obstacles they have faced and with the help of grown-ups who intervened at crucial times and love them deeply and fought aggressively on their behalf have a tramp in victory. those children are in the fire in the ashes that i celebrate today. and wish there were time to speak tonight to speak to all of them but there is not. i will speak of only one. a little girl who had won the hearts of the readers of my books and today it is one of my dearest friends whose nickname was pineapple. pineapple. pineapple is glorious six years old when i walked into her kindergarten class. a bossy little person slightly of the plum the side with corn rose across her eyes and started giving me instructions from the time we met to.
in dialogue. i hope that going forward the women in gendered city's poor and human rights would work toward not necessarily a debate, but a panel with less unilateral view on a topic that is very contentious in our society. i do have one specific question. when both you and professor spoke of the bishops not accepting a compromise that was positioned, it does seem to me a bit of a distinction without a difference. if i -- either i pay for something myself that i oppose par pay for somebody who must provide this thing that i oppose i wonder if you could just elaborate on why that seems a brilliant solution and what you think the bishops, why they continue to not see that. why i see that as not really much -- >> might taxes pay for an awful lot of things that i opposed. [applause] >> just to be clear, the position is that the institution's money does not go toward the care that they object to, so that is why i see it as an appropriate or a well intentioned and well functioning agreement. the money goes from women's pockets to the insurance that they are part of. while there may be other folks
, what initiatives would you put in place to make sure that jobs are created in the inner cities, like trenton, newark and jersey city? >> moderator: senator menendez, europe first. menendez: i'm proud of the areas we work in our state. the reality is that transit villages, the new transportation bill. i'm glad to see that with my leadership on mass transit, new jersey will receive, an additional $70 million more. that legislation is looking at saving and/or creating about 52,000 jobs. a lot of those transit villages and opportunities are right in urban areas, using advantage of our infrastructure. livable communities. my legislation in that regard but hope communities that are not only urban, but the more suburban, but nonetheless very close to urban areas would create greater development opportunity as well. and so, we are going to continue to work with these communities so that in fact they can realize the future of their citizens. >> moderator: senator kyrillos. kyrillos: as i go around the cities of new jersey, i am so sad to see the poverty, to see the unemployment, to see that t
control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to anyone. i believe it's a small number. in time this issue comes before the court the people the kind of fund 10% of people like eddies. it's a very small, tiny number. melson of in indiana and georgia , turnout has gone up with a minority in the overall turnout not just in the 2008 obama election but the midterm election. if there are people out there in light of a bloody let's cut the one. you can't participate in the mainstream american life of a melody. travel, check into tell, cash a check, antar government building, rent a video. he can hardly do anything. instead the critics rather than try to help people get ideas simply yell racism further exacerbating the racial political tensions. chris dodd who crafted a bipartisan lecturer -- reform b
people, working on projects in the case of future per -- perfect people working in cities and things like patent reform and new ways to fund prescription drugs. new ways to collaborate on the internet and fund the arts which is quick starter, i read about. a lot of different fields and made up of different stories about different fields, but it is still very early in the game with all these developments. and so, you know, future per fwek is designed kind of a short book, i wrote it, not to be fully comprehensive, in a way amplify those voices to celebrate what they were doing and inspire other people to come along and build on the new tradition. >> host: from your book, where good ideas come from, natural history of innovation, published in 2010, the history of being spectacularly right has a shadow history lurking behind it. a much longer history of being spectacularly wrong again and again and not just wrong but messy. error often creates a path that leads you to keep error often creates a path that leads you out of your comfortable assumptions. being right keeps you in place. being wro
, today people are throwing missiles not to -- into israel. to peaceful cities in israel. and that is the proof that the conflict is not about land. and i say enough with the peaceful idea. when president obama tide, [inaudible] prime minister netanyahu had to come here to washington, d.c. and to tell them no, we cannot. no, we cannot do what you want because it is much deeper than what we are willing to give. the conflict is about a third resistance of israel -- existence a visual. when you talk today palestinian leader communist in that they want more than back to the '67 line. they don't want to see jews living in the middle east. i want to conclude and changed the language that we speak regarding israel. all the time and in the book i put in, young generation of israelis -- [inaudible] enough with the apologetic. all the fun have to apologize. i'm talking in my book about the rights. we have writes initial. and i start with a biblical right. there is a lot of believers, christians and jews alike, it is written in the bible about the connection of jews to the land of i
, this was thenel signal for u.s. personnel to s move to our evacuation points and cities. my father who had served in the top vietnamese army understood that it was time that we, too, prepared to leave our home his country. for months, he and his kin had planned possible escape routes and finally decided on one.safe. his cousin had access to a helicopter that can carry everyone's safety. fly he and my dad decided on the day of the escape, we would fly the rlicopter above our house whico would indicate my dad to roundl. up the family members and get everyone to the nearby high school so on that chaotic morning when many saigon these were scrambling on the streets,e as the imminent collapse of their government drew near, my dad and his cousin told this helicopter, which had suffered heavy shelling and bombing, thee were actually denied entry. my dad turned homed and my cousn attempted entry by himself and was eventually successful., he when my i got her the helicopter blades above his house, despite one the militia, he knew it was time native there was one snack. my mom did not want to leave her wa
attention to sort of passive technique just because i'm from a big city, so much attention was being paid to the vote counting and precinct targeting. so i talk to more people, and i was always shocked as a think anybody who's spent a lot of time run campaigns is that most of the people i talk you could explain to me why they did anything that they would do. like how do you know that, how do you do that? at some point they did because that some sort of rule that was really based on any research. and so i sort of when run campaigns to some degree with skepticism, the practices that were taking place and the way they were spending time, and as big as i learned about people, starting in academe who are doing the field experiments, randomized control trials, within being adopted by people in the political world, and fund more about all the innovations of data, targeting based on, basically revolutionize campaigns in the last decade. this was a major generational shift in that in addition to all the new forms of research changing, the way campaigns operate issue that this kind of cultural tens
population of major cities in america, cities like miami, florida; tulsa, oklahoma; minneapolis/st. paul. their populations are all around 400,000 people. so i think when you are successful in signing up the equivalent of a major city in america for this service, you have something that is gaining traction and making sense. >> host: now, is this something that was mandated as part of the nbc deal, or is this something that comcast is doing on its own? is. >> guest: so the answer is both. this was a comcast concept that we, that we were preparing before the nbc universal transaction. we offered it up as a voluntary commitment to the fcc as something to help the fcc in its public interest determination, but we would have done this with or without the nbc universal transaction. and we've, obviously, gone far beyond the nature of the commitment in terms of the, in terms of eligibility of the program and the speed of the project, of the product, the way we're running sign-ups, the way we're promoting it. so we are, we are certainly in internet essentials 2.0, it barely resembles the origin pr
on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia officer antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big he
of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had the chance to read the book, and without a doubt it's the best judicial biography that i've ever read. so
and bombed the city, so syrians have been seen in this kind of an interesting technique to see how a dictatorship is trying to seem as applying and subscribing to the norms of the international committee, while its people are severely brutal or violent to it. >> thank you. therapy is >> is, good morning. came back for's tie. i am sean carlo gonzalez with talk service. i want to comment and say this is a blueprint -- on a blueprint, but a work in progress and i appreciate that. i know your type about a range of internal issues. what concerns have you addressed regarding serious role in the region regarding israel's concern that potentially this could be a safe haven for a? or iran's contention that this is a domestic issue. obviously, syria has a lot to do in this region and i just thought maybe i'd get your thoughts perhaps on what came out in your discussions. >> well, these issues that we have dealt with are mostly technical. you're talking about specific policy issues. and this of course will leave it up to any transitional government to devise his foreign policy, hopefully in c
this afternoon to see each and every one of you. you heard i grew up in a big city like washington, d.c. or a baltimore or silver springs or alexander. i grew up on a farm in rural alabama about 50 miles from montgomery. outside of a little place called troy. my father was a sharecropper but in 1944 when i was only 4-years-old, my father saved $300 he bought 110 acres of land and there was a lot of cotton and corn, peanuts, cows and chickens. on the form of was my responsibility to care for the chickens and i fell in love with raising chickens like no one else could raise chickens. does anyone else anything about raising chickens? can i see your hands? okay let's have a little fun this afternoon. [laughter] they're able to place them on the setting hand for the chicks to hatch some of you may be saying what were they able to? from time to time it began and you had to have fresh eggs. do you follow me? it's okay. it's all right. the chick would hatch i would take them and put them in a box with a lantern and raise them on their own or give them to another hen and do this for another th
voting. [talking over each other] >> in the city of brotherly love which you are from, the city of philadelphia where everything is run by the city and the genuine -- general election become the democratic people and what used to be the case that polling location were literally in people's garages you have no accountability. at one party control and so i can build and nobody watching the election. so you can complain that someone is trying and maybe staring too much into this, but what you had is no accountability and a number of places in this country and you can say republicans are wrong for doing this, there's a lot wrong on that site. what you're saying is not that that accountability when -- [talking over each other] >> both sides are right. there is some fraud. stay my site is more right. [laughter] >> there's certainly the tactics that they're choosing seem -- the notion of a modified poll tax what to do some of this is it's not the right way to go. in fact, pennsylvania law, there was a stay on it today in pennsylvania. so it's the wrong tactic and i hope that the change
major cities or small cities to the countryside. very difficult in my experience, through important trade which defined them and world view previous. i can have a few words to that. endurance, adaptability, confidence, sometimes over confidence. i think it's important to know this generation. in many ways, and also later day studying college. this early 1980s was the most liberal period in china's education system. they were really exposed to western ideas. they translate the constitution of development of foreign countries in uk and elsewhere into chinese. he reads english very well. now, that's really a wonderful opportunity, and, but these also could be the problem it has if we fail to understand that, this is a generation because of their personal experience they don't want to be lectured. they actually will be more, conducive with and get soft approach to talk for cooperation. but you just use force to intimidate them, they will act very first home. i hope that what i said is important. that if we use force, use just a single-minded lecture, we don't solve the knowledge of chin
russia, that you get the sense of semi-reference an immediate city can only have the spread mind again, that would be awesome. from castro to gorbachev, other communist things come to mind, obama. no, o'reilly is going to yell at me for that. they love theirs. it brings them back to the day where they could draw a bright line. the evil united states versus the communitarians and the former soviet union. they love celebrities who when they hear the word complicated, akron on slate gdp, they think gdp, gdp, is that late tng, but as jacob anna clark's now, gdp. it is not a teacher clothing line. you are equating? of course are not kidding. before you present you with a finalist and will give you a compilation heroes for the past five years. >> bruce babbitt was the governor of arizona nearly a year ago. did the purchase is the president he would have to raise taxes and he never was recovered from his courage. >> the soviet union, born and bred a revolution come about together by atrium that is still being drowned. it is the turn of a socialist nation marching towards the first communist s
, always had trouble keeping in line, where the holy cities are. iran is strongly institutionalized. it is not a 1-man sophistic -- it has different centers of power against each other in a complex bureaucratic border. the gift of the iranian plateau and geographic legitimacy provides the government over millennia. i would say our grand strategy has to be that the u.s. has been estranged from iran for a third of the century, a decade longer than we were estranged with red china between 40, and 72. at some point and this is what the saudis really worry and think about, there has to be a -- with iran. we have to think in those terms. does going to war -- all of iran supports a nuclear program but it is unclear that iran supports nuclear weapons. there is a distinction. so the real critical factor is what do we need to do to normalize relations with iran. the answer to that may be a strong military reaction if they weapon is. the long range strategy, the road map to normalizing u.s. relations with iran. >> interesting and good answer. it may well be that confrontation is the normalizat
ought in the farway city. i think i thought then it was done. this is as much as i could do. i decided i wasn't going duodwo 2012. my son, you know, was now a year old at this point. so he -- he's the only baby born in term one during the life of the campaign. he's the obama baby. my second baby, i'm digressing, my second son, was born about 120-day mark of the new administration. so we had a lot of stuff going on at home too. and so when i look at it, it's so different. because this time four years ago i had 58 races under my belt. the obama campaign had not one yet this year. i just think that this is really hard work to go -- many of them left for chicago about two years ago. and it's, you know, some people may describe it in the news as a flog. i imagine it is. it's probably really hard to go that long and have that one day at the very end. and i can't imagine, you know, and so that's a difference. i don't know yet. that's there. at this point, you had 58, 57 or 58 tests of us you could see how we were doing. we haven't had that yet for the obama campaign. even romney had races under
thinking of them like crazy. >> amazing underwater city. hauer lee was the publicity about wamu and i assume the political reports. >> so, wamu had a big blowup in 2004 that wasn't really hurt about but what happened is we spoke a little bit about how they basically had no infrastructure at the bank. they were operating on 12 different mortgage systems. all of that emerged around 2004 when they began basically trying to foreclose on homeowners who had actually pay their mortgage and the reason they did that is because they literally forgot to tell someone to go open the security boxes and pick up the homeowners checks. this is how bad it got. so the state started suing and all the analysts started writing reports saying they can't run a mortgage operation. this is what forced kerry killinger to get a president and chief operating officer. and that got bad publicity before. i think it was pretty bad and early 2007. that is different than the press. thank you you for your buck. i am a loan officer of 21 years' experience in seattle, and i can say you got it right, and this person's ques
city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and others are interested in his rhetoric. how much of it was involved in writing the speech but here is
's more attractive cities, but that's because you don't know the people there. they are just as straightforward and open-hearted and good as they can be. c-span: you write in your column--and this is a series of--well, i counted 70 columns? >> guest: that--i believe that's right. c-span: you write in your column about, 'lu--lubbock in my rearview mirror, perish the thought. for instance, one of the local television stations just ran a three-part investigative series on pantyhose called "born to run." is that true? >> guest: of course it's true. you can't make up stuff like that. and you never need to make up anything in texas because bizarre and strange things just always happen as a matter of course. c-span: now what's the difference between west texas and east texas? >> guest: oh, east texas is the very southern part of the state. in fact, i sometimes think that east texas is more like the old south than the old south is anymore. about 50 percent of the population there is black. it was plantation, cotton farming part of this--part of the state. but west texas is a totally
be anything since the boots dissented on the city laying favors for days on enand when he came to there was this new darkness in him i ain't never seen before. i gave my old ask a quick glance thinking of the record tucked away in there. it was not guilt i felt, well not that exact way. he was half world under the apache rug. he groaned, i need milk or go in the eye reckon. hero cost. i am trying to clean my stomach, not rough it up. his left eye twitched in the lead. it is milk i need rather, cream, that powdered stuff will rip right through you. like you are an hourglass. it ain't that bad i said. ain't nothing open at this hour anyway kids, you know that except maybe the coup but that is too far. lay in silence a minute. in a bad light i could make out the rams last few chairs huddle by the fireplace. they looked absurd like a flock of geese headed for the hatchet. day was the last of it, you see. it's been a grand old flat. all louix xiv chairs, chandeliers, tapestries, ceilings as high as the train station. but he urged her to sell what she could before the clouds came in.
nothing since the boost offended on the city in late fever is fashion when it comes to come and there is a new darkness in him i never seen before. i gave my all to ask a quick lance, thinking of the record text away in there. it was a guilty cells. well, not exactly. he was sort of half rolled onto the road. all said, he groaned, and personnel? in the cupboard i reckon. pierrot coughed. i'm trying to clean my stomach, not profit. his left eye twitched high up on the lid, do we sometimes see the heart of a thin woman beating through her blouse. it's milk i need, brother. cream. that powder stuff over at right through you, like you in our class. it ain't that bad i said. it's not open at this hour anyway, kid. you know that. except maybe the crew. but that's too far. in silence a minute. and the bat that i could just make out the last few chairs. like a flock of geese hiding because there was the last of it that's than a grand old flat to go by stories. i'll be with the 14 shares, chandeliers, tapestries, and stickiness hyatt at the train station. but he don't urge her to sel
of introducing my friend jay. he's a senior partner at kirk land and ellis here in new york city. he's a well known commodity in the washington policy world having served with the distinction in two different administration as cabinet secretary under president george h. w. bush and directer of domestic policy. he's known throughout washington as a keen policy intellectual with incredible ability to is the acid complex issues and unparalleled efficiency. he written on great authority on many things. for our purposes today it should be noted that he serve a special envoy in the position jay was known for the fourth right criticism not simply of the north korean tyranny for tailing to do more to assist creern. jay did not spare criticism either of the folks in foggy bottom. he was well known for criticizing state department policy that seemed more concerned nuclear program on stopping the program itself or in promoting human rights in the country. with that please give a warm welcome to jay. [applause] >> thank you for the very warm introduction. it's a pleasure to be here with you today for wha
difficult circumstances with the dignity that is unmatched in this city and any of the great cities in the country. it's a mobility of humanity simply because of the dignity with which the negatives that were put in their way and the harshness of life. my grandmother is still the greatest person. you told me of a person who could have accepted and not have a father or lose a mother handed from pillar to post from the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshape
similar but truman began his career working at a bank, working in kansas city. his roommate for the first year was arthur eisenhower, eisenhower's oldest brother. they live together in the same room. the same rooming house. been back there is a document that is in the war papers and i don't know how many historians have seen this one but it was a message in effect being relayed to eisenhower through his older brother from harry truman who was then a senator in missouri and had not been elevated to the vice presidency yet and had and it was about 1943 emma before the political year began. this is from the u.s. senator of missouri to be commander of the european forces, the supreme allied institution of forces. you are the inevitable successor of franklin roosevelt and as it turns out harry truman finds himself in a role like andrew johnson after the american civil for somebody who has been dropped into this natural succession. >> unfortunately we could probably go for another hour and we'll have 150 questions. we have one minute left. you get 15 seconds of it and we will give our panel is
as a threat from london and from other cities around the world. >> steven johnson is our guest sunday taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on in depth. the author will look at sites history, the cyber world, popular culture in computer networking and politics. live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine, and its significance to the story of uncle tom's cabin is that in many ways the story began you. is here in this q., q. number 23, that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw a vision of uncle tom being whipped to death. now, uncle tom as you probably know as the title character of the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin. uncle tom's cabin was written very much as a protest novel, by anyone in the north, take a in knowing what all abolitionists lived, if anyone in the north was to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill which was seen as kind of the compromise between the north and south to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to d
voted so look, in campaigns from presidential down to city council every aspect of the campaign message turnout. i think the air wars are the ones that get all the coverage on tv but i think the ground wars will be equally important. look, i think the other thing about the electorate is at least in "the wall street journal" colin the nbc poll that the two firms collaborated on it was pre-debate. you know the president was winning independent voters by 13 points. and, in 2008 he defeated john mccain by 8% with independent smacks so with the admonition of less -- let's wait until the dust has settled and see the polls in the next couple of days i'm going to be looking at the numbers in the other thing very quickly in terms of the minority vote. the other thing about barack obama's election in 2008 was the one something on the order of 43% of the white vote and in most of the national polls that is kind of where he is so that will be another number to look out for. the country is changing and in 2008, three-quarters of the electorate was white which was down from the mid-to high 80s 20 yea
in the iowa delegation on a continual basis. in 2008 when the floods hit in iowa city i went over there immediately and flew over all that and went on the ground and met with the leaders of cedar rapids for example for the democrats that represent that part of the state. they didn't take me about but rejoined me together and everything. when we get hit with floods on the side of the state become over and join me. i introduced legislation to protect us from the next flood coming down the missouri river with the sign on right away. that is the bipartisanship the you get in a national disaster. they are less partisan and congress but we have had a broad bipartisan effort here with an iowa working with those things that matter to iowa and hopefully i will be able to get a bipartisan support on the farm bill like a forgotten by partisans of along the missouri river legislation. h.r. 2942 in case you want to google that. >> moderator: mrs. vilsack how did you cut through the partisanship and build consensus in congress? vilsack: i was with amy klobuchar yesterday and she is someone that
possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin and the story of uncle tom's cabin is that there was a slave, a very very good slave who was sold by his first time owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him in order to pay a debt on his plantation. through a series of misadventures you might say, he ends up in the hands of a very unruly owner who is so irritated by him and his goodness, that he whips him to death and this is the scene out
and if we can get to all of the components. in 2009 after president obama took office the city was sacked included new credits that were primarily focused on low-income families and families that have kids in college that were extended in 2010 and expired at the end of the year. there's the timber cut in social security payroll taxes the was done in the stimulus for 2011 and extended for 2012. and then in addition to all of those expiring tax provisions that got most of the attention from the fiscal macroeconomic point of view and another thing we have to the start of next year and the tax increases included in the 2010 health reform act. and so, when you look at the debate over the fiscal cliff, the point is to recognize there is a very diverse array of tax provisions that are under discussion. and that's important for understanding the effects on american households, different households are affected differently by these provisions. at the low end of the income distribution for example the credits that were enacted in 2009 turn out to be very important as the temporary payroll taxes. te
go out there. >> [inaudible conversations] >> and city where you're from, you can comment on it or not. in the city of philadelphia everything is run by the city and the jdge of election end up becoming the democratic committee people and what used to be the case that polling locations were literally in people's garages you had no accountability. you had one party control and you had zero accountability and nobody watching the election. you can complain that somebody is trying and steering too much in the swerve what you have is no accountability in one party rule in number of places in the country and you can say republicans are all for doing this. there's a lot wrong happening on both sides. what you're saying is not crazy easy. to have the accountability. >> i agree it's not easy. just because it's hard -- [inaudible] >> look both sides are right. there is some fraud. >> my side is more right. [laughter] >> there's certainly is fraud and tactics they're choosing seems to be important. the motion of a modified poll tax which is what some of this is not the right way to g
achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to talk about the stimulus because it is a new new deal and a bit about obama because there's more and less to him than meets the eye. i spent nine years as a reporter at the washington post before i escaped the belt way with my florida girl. government is not a new topic for me. i did not think i could have written this book if i still lived in washington. the group think is too strong and it is almost impossible to overstate the power of the conventional wisdom that the stimulus was a ludicrous failure and totally uncool to talk about it without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave
because her at higher screen that she was from a wealthy part of the city. her attire was sending a message that got in her way. >> what are some of the other key differences that winning seek high office space other than men seeking high office? >> there are so many. we were talking about is a little bit at dinnertime, the fact that a woman needs credentials that are the highest caliber, where as as i mentioned earlier, a man you just comes onto the national scene who is perhaps just elected senator can run for president, or be seen as presidential. were as the woman needs foreign affairs experience. you know, she needs to preferably be a governor, and that some of the work barbara lee has done with keys to the governors mentioned, the idea that it wouldn't be acceptable for a woman to just get elected president from a senate position. she would need more than that. the highest level of credential where as we will accept a than a resume from a male candidate because he looks the part. >> we were talking about this at dinner that, you know, a male candidate they will say well, he
of many others in the city and not just like ourselves. >> mark, do you want to pose the last question? >> just a quick one. something not addressed in the comments by deputy secretary carter, and it's rarely mentioned, but taiwan, under its existing republic china constitution, is an independent sorch state, the absent of relations does not sub tract from the reality. with this in mine, there's sensitivities with beijing. i'm curious, what potential role could taiwan play in u.s. rebalancing in asia? what are we missing now, and what could be done more in leveraging with what taiwan has to offer with the united states and its interests? >> this is a trap. [laughter] he knows the answer to the question. [laughter] i will fall into it anyway. [laughter] my own view, and this is a whole, you know, i think other conversation about building fore structure and capacity in asia pacific is that the states that are a bit weaker than china can pull a page out of china and develop their own anti-access scenario and denial capabilities and make it woefully painful for china to project power into
-verse in the city of san francisco, and it took several years for them to get the approvals to roll out this video service. and i mention that in particular because video is one area where there has been a lot of talk about the need for increased competition. here you have a tradition call telecommunications provider trying to enter the marketplace to provide video, and in my view municipalities and state governments and the federal government should do everything it can to reduce those barriers to make sure we don't stand in the way of more competition. >> david cohen on his episode of "the communicators" said that he budget concerned about google fiber being a competitive threat because he doesn't think that google or anybody else simply has the money to be able to invest in it across the country. do you think that's a problem we're facing, that there isn't enough capital to make that investment? >> guest: um, from my vantage point i can't say whether or not there's enough capital. what i can say is many companies have told me that they are sitting on billions of dollars on their balance sheepts
to say this, they do some good things, particularly david koch who is the wealthiest man in new york city. you thought michael bloomberg was. no, it's david koch. but he funds the metropolitan opera, big supporter of it. the metropolitan museum of art, cancer research centers around the country. but most of their money goes into political activities, and they are everywhere. the heritage foundation in washington, d.c., koch brothers. the cato institute when it started, koch brothers. some of you may know now the koch brothers -- cato kind of went its own independent way, and the koch brothers are now suing the cato institute to get it back to be a totally controlled koch brothers' operation. people, americans for prosperity, the most active political organization today, all funded by the koch brothers. freedomworks, dick armey's organization, koch brothers. john kasich in ohio, koch brothers' candidate. bought lock, stock and barrel by the koch brothers. same with scott walker in wisconsin. everywhere. in california a couple of years ago there was a measure, prop 23 on the ballot, to repe
, of the kansas city experiment, if you will, you know, shows, i think it demonstrates quite clearly, um, the magnitude of the enormous investment that the cable industry has made in building out our infrastructure across the country. and i, you know, i just, i just don't know that i see a business model for the expenditure of that level of money to build out, um, a national fiber or network. said the same thing when verizon went into the market with fios, and at&t, obviously, thought the same thing since when they developed their u-verse product, they decided not to build a national or even regional fiber network. so, um, we've, you know, we've consistently said and continue to believe that we're not afraid of competition, we like our product, we like our position, we think competition makes us a better company. um, we think it makes us sharpen our focus, improve the level of service that we're providing, improve the quality and the innovation of our offerings and just like satellite made comcast a better company and then verizon and u-verse have made comcast a bettny and forced us to i
guess that's lisbon our job. i've only working for political cities in columbus, ohio, and albany, new york, so i was sort of brought up in very political cities with high profile governors. i was working -- [inaudible] but you do have some extent put that out of your mind now because it used to be if you had a tough, maybe even uncomfortable moment with somebody, that was it. it played, it was done. now it's out there forever. i think it's more important than ever we have a lot of news sources that aren't really news, that those folks who believe our journalists and/or trained journalists and believe that what we did is still important, getting of information, you know, about very consequential positions people are going to make about what they do and they go into a voting booth, that we do pushback. and i also would say that i'd be curious to hear what the others think. i'm on television all the time, but the standards are different. they are different for men and women and how you can pushback, and how tough you can be in pushing back. and you also find it and it depends on who the
going to be base brightening to pay for the power mac city goals, in fact one way would be to do lower rate cuts. >> top, you want to tackle the second half of the question? >> well, actually there were some other things that were not good in the 2001 or 2002 to 2006. when it comes to mind is the prescription drug benefit in 2003. since we are having a fiscal discussion come i feel compelled to note that the 2003 help expansion legislation was financed while the 2000 legislation was paid for. >> other questions? yes, sir. >> patcher cluster, omb watch. my question about the politics referred to as indirectly, that no one has done explicitly. republicans have been held accountable by someone not in this room, grover norquist forgot accepting tax increase. anything with a tax increase supported in a primary. the day before we had the fiscal cliff, policies that would be called a tax increase at that time, the day after the same policies would be called a tax cut. for political reasons, isn't it necessary to get revenue increases and will also be able to demand support of republicans, don
chamber of commerce, military.com, and recruit military llc, from big cities to small towns, from convention centers to american legion posts. if you're not into one of these events, i strongly encourage you to do so. there he will see firsthand the quality of these returning servicemen and women, employers who understand their value, and legionnaires who are dedicated to improving their lives. the men and women who fought for this country should have to fight for a job when they return home. veterans, their families and american legion will keep working to revive our nation's economy. efforts to improve opportunities through licensing and credentialing, for job fairs and business development must continue in earnest. for mainly newly minted veterans the ability to get a job and earn a decent income has been diminished because of the sacrifices made in uniform. that is why we simply must come up with a solution to a problem that has been with us for years. unfortunately, it has gotten worse. the v8 claims backlog. i would challenge anyone in addition to recall a time when the amer
wonder if you have opinions on the new york city school warship which deals with off our and other religious groups meeting in those schools. >> i am against it. >> i am too and i can't understand it. it is bizarre to me. it is bizarre to me that new york has done its heels in on giving access to facilities on the same basis to religious groups they do to other groups. not talking about religion, just keeps on going. i would have thought they would have given up on that. it is a very bad idea, the new york policy is a very bad idea. >> they have the constitutional authority to do what it did. there is room for joints where governments can act to avoid and cause problems. >> the health mandate covered mine so i will follow-up on this. there was no religious representation of the september 11th memorial service. i will get into a point where we're so pluralistic religiously that the only way to accommodate everyone is no religion in the public square? >> i should hope not. i hope the response to the diversity is what the flowers bloom rather than spray roundup on them. >> i hope not
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